Friday, 13 May 2011

Quotes of the Week: From Twitter and super-injunctions to how to stop being on the front page


The Sun: "How appropriate that stars who behaved like twits should be exposed on Twitter. Once again Britain's medieval gagging orders look absurd as the internet hums with revelations newspapers are banned from repeating - even though newspapers got the stories in the first place."

Guardian editor-in-chief Alan Rusbridger, giving the Anthony Sampson lecture at City University: "On privacy, I've never yet been threatened. If you look at investigative journalism in the last couple of years, the Guardian has done as much anybody. BAE, torture, policing of demonstrations, phone hacking, WikiLeaks and all that. Nothing we've done has been touched by privacy."

Mail on Sunday on actor Hugh Bonneville: "Hugh’s devotion to wife Lulu is so strong it is understood he is known to fellow thespians as the Ryan Giggs of the showbusiness world, after the famously family-orientated footballer."

Guardian reader complaining about the paper's royal wedding coverage: "I have considerable brand loyalty to the Guardian. I buy it because it reflects my values. I define myself as (among other things) a Guardian reader. To me, the Guardian is not just another newspaper: it's a community of people who keep me informed about the things that matter, share my values and give me a voice. Yesterday, you informed me about things that don't matter, trampled on my values, and gave me no voice. It would not be exaggerating to say that I feel betrayed."

Guardian readers' editor Chris Elliott: "It's hard to judge the social and cultural significance of a "happening", which pushed up sales of the Guardian by more than 100,000 on the day after the wedding, and which led to more than 3 million people visiting the website on the wedding day. Journalists can, on occasions, lead readers, but cannot wilfully ignore events that can create such a powerful response.""

David Cameron in the Sun on the BBC's Today programme: "I tend to listen to the six o'clock headlines. But I don't listen to masses of the Today programme because I want to keep my sense of optimism as I go into the day!' "

Guido Fawkes' advice to celebs on SKY News:
“If you don’t want to be on the front pages then don’t pay hookers to stick dildos up your bum.” Adam Boulton moved swiftly on.

1 comment:

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